The UK’s Number 1 Hit Music Station

7 June 2018, 20:48 | Updated: 26 September 2018, 15:18

When it comes to hit music, Capital is the UK’s number 1:

1.    Capital Network UK (Reach 7,416,000)

2.    Kiss Network UK (Reach 5,529,000)

In terms of all radio listening, Capital comes in behind BBC Radio 2 (Reach 15,302,000), BBC Radio 4 (Reach 10,790,000), BBC Radio 1 (Reach 9,314,000), BBC Local Radio (Reach 8,218,000) and Heart (Reach 8,661,000). As these stations play different music* to what you hear on Capital, when it comes to playing the biggest and freshest tunes out there, Capital continues to be the UK’s Number 1 Hit Music Station. 

Data released from RAJAR Q2 2018, ages 15+ (released 02.08.18).

Reach refers to the total number of different people or households exposed, at least once, to a medium during a given period. RAJAR (the official body for measuring radio audiences) defines the weekly reach of a radio station as the number of people who tune into a radio station for at least 5 minutes (within at least one 15min period) in a given week.

We are defining ‘hit’ as music from the contemporary charts; Official UK Chart  and Spotify UK Top 50. 

Manchester's Number 1 Hit Music Station

When it comes to hit music, Capital is Manchester’s Number 1 as you’ll see from the below audience figures (aged 15+) from Q2 2018:

1.    Capital Manchester (Reach 555,000)

2.    Radio 1 (Reach 415,000)

3.    Hits Radio (Reach 378,000)

In terms of all radio listening, Capital comes in behind BBC Radio 2 (Reach 718,000) and Smooth North West (627,000). As both of these stations play different music* to what you hear on Capital Manchester, when it comes to playing the biggest and freshest tunes out there, Capital continues to be Manchester’s Number 1 Hit Music Station.

Data released from RAJAR Q2 2018 (released 02.08.18) Adults 15+ across Capital Manchester’s TSA – the area that our transmitters reach on FM.

*BBC Radio 2 

The Radio 2 Service License specifies that the remit of the station is ‘to be a distinctive mixed music and speech service, targeted at a broad audience, appealing to all age groups over 35. It should offer entertaining popular music programmes and speech-based content including news, current affairs, documentaries, religion, arts, comedy and social action output.’ It’s music output should include ‘musical genres that do not normally receive wide exposure’ and should ‘educate audiences in musical terms and extend their tastes by maintaining a playlist of new releases that emphasises new artists and less familiar tracks.’ 

*BBC Radio 4 

The Radio 4 Service License specifies that the remit of the station is ‘to be a mixed speech service, offering in-depth news and current affairs and a wide range of other speech output including drama, readings, comedy, factual and magazine programmes. The service should appeal to listeners seeking intelligent programmes in many genres which inform, educate and entertain.’

*BBC Radio 1

The Radio 1 Service License specifies that the remit of the station is to ‘entertain and engage a broad range of young listeners with a distinctive mix of contemporary music and speech’ and ‘should offer a range of new music, support emerging artists…and provide a platform for live music’. Additionally, its evening programmes must cover a ‘broad range of musical genres’ and live music should cover both established acts and experimental new bands. Speech output (documentaries, social action campaigns) must also form an integral part of the schedule. Radio 1 must ensure that it broadcasts at least 60 hours of ‘specialist music’ each week.

*BBC Local Radio

The BBC Local Radio Service License specifies that the remit of the station is ‘to provide a primarily speech-based service of news, information and debate to urban and rural communities. Speech output should be complemented by music. The target audience should be listeners aged 50 and over, who are not well-served elsewhere. There should be a strong emphasis on interactivity and audience involvement.’

*Heart 

The Heart Service License specifies that the remit of the station is to be ‘a mainstream popular music-led service for 25 to 44 year-olds, supplemented with news, information and entertainment. the service should have particular appeal to people in their 30s.’

*Smooth North West

The Smooth North West Service License specifies that the remit of the station is 'an easy listening station featuring lifestyle orientated speech, targeting a North West audience aged 50-plus.' It is clear, therefore, that Smooth North West’s service is not characterized nor defined by playing ‘hit’ music.