Love Island Accepting LGBTQ+ Applications For 2021 Series

12 April 2021, 15:53

Love Island producers are set to cast their most diverse line-up yet.
Love Island producers are set to cast their most diverse line-up yet. Picture: Instagram

Love Island’s upcoming summer series is accepting applications from gay singletons in a bid to cast their ‘most diverse line-up ever’.

Capital FM

By Capital FM

Love Island’s big return this summer is accepting applications from singletons in the LGBTQ+ community.

Producers of the ITV2 dating show have teamed up with Tinder in a bid to cast a more diverse line-up of contestants, with the app allowing anyone to apply via the ‘fast track’ process, regardless of their sexuality.

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It was first noticed by users of the app who had seen the advert pop up, with a source telling this publication: “ITV and Love Island teamed up with Tinder earlier this year to find a new batch of islanders.

"They have been placing the ads strategically inside the app so you have to swipe left or right. The ads have been showing up on both male and female gay accounts as well as on those of straight people."

Love Island will return this year after it was cancelled last summer.
Love Island will return this year after it was cancelled last summer. Picture: ITV
Paige Turley and Finn Tapp won the winter Love Island series in 2020.
Paige Turley and Finn Tapp won the winter Love Island series in 2020. Picture: Paige Turley/Instagram

ITV told the publication: “Our only stipulation for applicants on Love Island is that they are over 18, single and looking for love."

The dating series has previously included LGBTQ+ contestants, with Love Island’s executive producer, Richard Cowles saying that they are open to it, despite it bringing “logistical difficulties”.

He told the tabloid: “You are trying to create couples. It is not impossible and it is not something that we shy away from... but there is a logistical element which makes it difficult,” referring to the element of the show which requires all singletons to be coupled up with a partner.

This comes after it was reported that producers are looking for their most diverse line-up yet after it has previously been criticised for being “too white and having a lack of body diversity”.

Katie Salmon and Sophie Gradon were the first same-sex couple on Love Island back in 2016.
Katie Salmon and Sophie Gradon were the first same-sex couple on Love Island back in 2016. Picture: ITV

A source previously told this tabloid that fans of the show want to see more "relatable" contestants, saying: “Viewers want to see women and men that they can relate to and hot singletons come in all shapes and sizes so this is a positive move."

The show is said to have extended its application process in order to diversify the line-up.

Over 100,000 applications have been sent off already, but there’s still time to get applying!

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